Difference: FstAdvancedUsage (67 vs. 68)

Revision 682018-01-10 - KyleGorman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="WebHome"
Line: 874 to 874
 
Name Description
SortedMatcher Binary search on sorted input doc
Changed:
<
<
RhoMatcher<M> ρ symbol handling; templated on underlying matcher doc
SigmaMatcher<M> σ symbol handling; templated on underlying matcher doc
PhiMatcher<M> φ symbol handling; templated on underlying matcher doc
>
>
RhoMatcher<M> ρ-symbol handling; templated on underlying matcher doc
SigmaMatcher<M> σ-symbol handling; templated on underlying matcher doc
PhiMatcher<M> φ-symbol handling; templated on underlying matcher doc
 
MultiEpsMatcher<M> Treats specified non-0 labels as non-consuming labels (in addition to 0) doc
ExplicitMatcher<M> Suppresses any implicit matches of non-consuming labels doc
Changed:
<
<
SortedMatcher requires the underlying Fst be sorted on the appropriate side. How it matches epsilons requires some explanation. Find(0) matches any epsilons on the underlying Fst explicitly (as if they were any other symbol) but also returns an
>
>
SortedMatcher expects the underlying FST be sorted on the appropriate side. Find(0) matches any epsilons on the underlying FST explicitly (as if they were any other symbol) but also returns an
 implicit self-loop (namely Arc(kNoLabel, 0, Weight::One(), current_state) if the match_type is MATCH_INPUT and
Changed:
<
<
Arc(0, kNoLabel, Weight::One(), current_state) if the match_type is MATCH_OUTPUT). In other words, an epsilon matches at every state without moving forward on the matched FST, a natural interpretation. This behavior implements epsilon-transition handling in composition, or, more generally, a 'non-consuming' match as with the MultiEpsMatcher (with kNoLabel informing composition of such a match). A
>
>
Arc(0, kNoLabel, Weight::One(), current_state) if the match_type is MATCH_OUTPUT); in other words, an epsilon matches at every state without moving forward on the matched FST, a natural interpretation. This behavior implements epsilon-transition handling in composition, or, more generally, a 'non-consuming' match as with the MultiEpsMatcher (with kNoLabel informing composition of such a match). A
 composition filter determines which of these epsilon transitions are ultimately accepted. Any matcher used in composition and related algorithms must implement these implicit matches for correct epsilon handling. In some other uses, the implicit matches may not be needed. In that case, an ExplicitMatcher can be used to conveniently suppress them (or the user can recognize the kNoLabel loop and skip them).
 
This site is powered by the TWiki collaboration platform Powered by PerlCopyright © 2008-2018 by the contributing authors. All material on this collaboration platform is the property of the contributing authors.
Ideas, requests, problems regarding TWiki? Send feedback